Project news Preventing erosion in vegetables and maize: 4 years of GOMEROS

25/02/2020
field with different soil textures
Certain cultivation techniques can be used to prevent erosion

34 field trials with non-inversion tillage, strip-till, full-field seeding, modified planting machines, ridge-tilling and more. GOMEROS conducted 4 years of research on erosion in vegetables and corn. Download the gewas- en techniekfichesfor farmers now!

Cultivation techniques to reduce erosion

Erosion is a problem that has attracted more attention in recent years, partly because of the changed boundary conditions on plots of land that are highly susceptible to erosion in Flanders. Minimal tillage and a whole series of other cultivation-technical measures have been tested and improved over the past four years in the GOMEROS project to prevent erosion in vegetables and maize. Participation of the sector was important throughout the project.

Practical and cost effective

Cultivation techniques to reduce erosion must not only be preventive against erosion, they must also be practically feasible for the grower, without yield losses. In addition to optimization of existing techniques, techniques cited by farmers themselves were also tested. The knowledge gained is made available online for the general public (see www.gomeros.be and ILVO communications 226, 241, 251, 256 and 257). "Crop and technique sheets" have been prepared for the farmers, giving an overview per crop of the causes of erosion, concrete techniques to tackle erosion and some corresponding practical tips.

Read more about the project results in the last GOMEROS newsletter (in Dutch).

Project title: GOMEROS
Funding: VLAIO, Boerenbond, ABS, Vegebe, Ingro, BND, VEGRAS, PACKO, Steeno
Term: 2016 - 2019
Partners: PCG, Inagro

Questions?

Contact us

Thijs Vanden Nest

ILVO researcher

Greet Ruysschaert

Soil expert

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